SURF EXPO 2013 / SEPT 6-8 / ORLANDO, FL

single fin, fcs fins, future fins, SUP fins

It’s that time of year again, Surf Expo in Orlando, FL is happening this week Friday 9/6 -9/8.  Stop by the True Ames Booth #969. We will have a full selection of our latest surf fins and SUP fins.  Lots of different fins in stock right now for your single fin, twin fin, thruster, quads, and we offer different 2+1 setups for longboards and SUP boards.  our system fins are available in FCS and Futures Compatible.

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For more than three decades Chuck Ames and the True Ames Fins team have been at the forefront of the fiberglass fin industry. Balancing a surfer-driven design ethic with an unyielding commitment to innovation and production excellence, we have forged an international reputation in the surfing and windsurfing communities as the guys who, simply put, make your waveriding vehicle of choice work even better. After all, as Chuck likes to say, “You could have the best board in the world shaped for you but, if the fins are off, it won’t go- the thing just won’t work the way it should.” Day in and day out, it is our goal at True Ames to make sure such fin failures never happen to you.

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TYLER WARREN QUAD FINS

Tyler Warren Quad fins available in FCS and Futures Compatible and glass onstyler-warren-fins-quad700-2

Here is an article from the latest issue of Surfing Magazine. Tyler Warren talks about his Quadratic Egg Shape. A very Versatile board that can handle waist high to double overhead surf.  tyler-warren-quad-fins-700

Fin Design at True Ames: The Importance of Fin Template and Foil

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The outline of a fin is what determines the area and the look. The way the area is distributed on the fin is what makes fins individual and work in so many different ways. A wide base fin with a wide tip is the most stable but not forgiving. A narrow base fin with a narrow tip will be very loose and fast but unstable at slow speeds.

The fin’s sweep (or rake angle) affects the board’s ability to carve turns. A more vertical fin will make tight turns and fast directional changes while a more raked fin will carve wider arcs and handle more power through turns.

Tail width is also a factor in fin choice. Narrow tail boards do not require deep fins because there is less distance from the fin to the rail. A wide board requires a deeper fin than a narrower board. For example an 8’ egg style board that is on the wide side should use about an 8.5” to 9.0” fin. A narrow tail single fin board that is 7’6” can use a fin in the 7” to 8” range.

True Ames Surf Fins incorporate a constant foil which means you will not find any flat spots on our fins that may cause water disturbance which will ultimately cause poor performance. Our bigger solid color fins are foiled from 7/16” solid 6oz. glass sheet stock. Smaller fins do not need to be so thick to have the proper foil.

To read more about fin design and how to choose the best surf fins check out trueames.com

 

John Perry Surfboards: Threedom

Our friend John Perry is constantly working on new board designs and bringing some back from the archives. Check out his latest: This is a short board shape with a 2+1 setup. His Team riders Shawn and Tony are putting this board to the test. check out the article below.
Check out the John Perry Performer fin at trueames.com

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The conception of the ”Threedom” fin configuration came over us, myself and one of my best mates Dave Lambertson of Carpinteria, in a garage relaxing over a couple of games of billiards  In 1980, we had a circus of board designs to choose from; single fins, twinnies and now the thruster.  That being said the focus of our conversation slipped right into critiquing board design.  Ok, so the single fin is maxing out with no-noses, wide points behind center and wider tails.  The twin fin, for those that could ride them, were slashing and skating in and out of control, if you will and then the resolve to those who couldn’t manage either was the thruster, to plug the gap, no offense to twin lovers.  I always had respect for those that could rip them.

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Oh….so back to the “Threedom” concept………. Dave, a sagey kind of thinker, proceeded to analyze the thruster.  Apparently he said he had had an earlier epiphany before he went to sleep one night about making the side fins smaller and the back fin taller to alleviate the tension on your back foot that never seems to allow you to stray too far from the cluster.  I was now mind surfing his epiphany and senses.  At that time I had a shaping bay inside the surf shop called “Ocean Rhythms” and couldn’t wait until morning to draw one up.  I had some outlines in mind already that might fit this new fin array and found the fin size; shape and placement had to be placed properly to meet this vision.  Obviously I made Dave the first one and was glassed by Moonlight Glassers of San Diego.

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Since the wave prospects in Santa Barbara in the summer are rare, we ventured deep into mainland Mexico for some testing.  We hit some classic, quality waves and a bonus hurricane 10’ swell!  I had brought down a thruster and we traded off the new one which we hadn’t named yet between us.  I approached it with no expectation, just go for it and see where it wanted to take me.  Well, it did the opposite!  I took it where I wanted to go, kind of like surfing where your eyes lead you.  Wow!  My feet weren’t always over the fins and I could trim forward like a single fin. Cutbacks were smooth and drifted controllably, pulling verticals without losing speed and almost at will due to the side fins that are placed higher up on the rail line.  Because the side fins are toe in slightly and the fins spread further apart from one another, there is low drag and lots of carried speed throughout the tail section.  Needless to say, that is where we both agreed to characteristically call it “Threedom” (freedom!).
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In good fun, we added the “All World’ phrase to go along with our shared venture into discovery.  Obviously our take on this was not to replace a particular design, but to expand our horizons.  We made about 150 “Threedoms” out of Ocean Rhythms in the early 1980’s.  The board model never really was acknowledged all these years due to the explosion of board marketing and professional surfing.  It is fun to share this design now since there is a new explosion of sharing all and any kind of board design.  Some 30 years later, I still prefer riding the “Threedom” fin configuration which now is typically called a 2 + 1 set up.  I know that there are some of you out there that have experienced the “Threedom” in the same light Dave and I have.

 

Wooden Surf Fins: Machine Foiled

The Tyler Warren Bar of Soap fin is designed for the small Twin fin “bar or soap board” These boards typically come in sizes 4’11” to 5’3″ and are super wide and compact…Much of Tyler’s inspiration in designing the “Bar of Soap” came from his experience riding two of Richard Kenvin’s Hydrodynamica Project boards: The White Pony and Casper. Both of these boards were inspired by the hydrodynamic planing hull surfboards created by Bob Simmons 60 years ago. Check out the wood fin selection

10″ base x 4 5/8″ depth–These wood surf fins are machine foiled to perfection. The cedar grain gives these fins optimum flex / stiffness. To make these easier for you to glass them on, there is one layer of glass on each side. Wood fins also have positive buoyancy, they float! The best part is that we make them here, in house.

GEORGE GREENOUGH SURF FINS: History of The Stage 6 Fin


Above: a photo of some of George Greenough’s original designs for the paddle fin, and a collection of some windsurf boards and molds. ( Spoon and Chopper ) He used to make almost all of his fins, boards and other equipment, and was an innovator who enjoyed creating and reinventing.

Here is a look at a timeline showing how a fin that was created for a windsurf board, adapted over time to a surfboard fin. Through trial and error, many hours in the shop and in the water, we now have the ” Stage 6.”

Late 60’s George makes the first paddle fins out of stainless steel. Sometimes these fins would take 2 or 3 days to grind and finish, but the end product was worth every second of labor for George. In fact, he was windsurfing one day and lost the fin on the rocky bottom. He came back at low tide for a few days of countless hours of searching and found the metal fin in tide pools.

1987 Greenough encourages Chuck Ames to use the paddle fin design on surfboards. The result: A thruster setup with 3 small paddle fins, unfortunately they would break off since they were glassed on with and had a very small base.

1990’s As system fin box designs developed became widely available these paddle fins were tested out again, the problem was the base of the fin was still too narrow, especially for smaller thruster setups

early 2000: The paddle fin design was now adapted to fit onto a longboard with a fin box and produced great results. True ames labeled the fin The “Stage 6” the combination of a stiff leg and active paddle to generate powerful turns, the bigger sizes were powerful on the tip.

Today: The greenough “Stage 6” fin has come a long way and is a classic model that’s been refined and perfected. From the early days being crafted of metal, to now, where the fin is light and has the perfect flex and made of high quality fiberglass.

Below: a photo of early paddle fins on a shortboard.

 

Greenough Stage 6 Fin By True Ames